Book Launch Event: National Geographic Traveler 'Romania'

14th February 2008

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Thursday 14 February 2008 The Romanian Cultural Centre in London / Ratiu Foundation and The Embassy of Romania in the UK have the pleasure to invite you to a Book Launch Event: National Geographic Traveler ‘Romania’ by Caroline Juler Thursday 14 February 2008 18.30-20.30, 1 Belgrave Square, London SW1X 8PH (see map here) ENTRANCE BY INVITATION ONLY. If you would like to take part to the event please write to us at or call us on Tel. 020 7439 4052, ext. 108. Share your love for Romania at this special book launch! It also happens to be Valentine’s day and the programme will celebrate it Romanian-style, with a host of Romanian treats! It’s a win-win situation: a Valentine’s day date and a book launch event – all in a most exquisite Central London location. And the book makes for a perfect gift for your Romania-loving significant other. Caroline Juler will sign copies of the book. Order the book in advance from the Romanian Cultural Centre in London, at the special price of £9.99 (normal price £14.99), by sending a cheque by Friday 8 February at the latest, and you can pick up your copy at the event. (Sorry, no mail deliveries). Please send a cheque made out to ‘The Romanian Cultural Centre’ at the following address: Romanian Cultural Centre, 54-62 Regent Street, London W1B 5RE. Synopsis: In 1989, the Iron Curtain finally fell after dividing Europe for so many years. It's been generations since Romania's historic cities, rolling mountains, rustic villages, and rejuvenating spas and resorts have been so accessible. From the museums and neighbourhoods of the bustling capital city of Bucharest and the famous painted monasteries of Bucovina to the soft sands of the Black Sea resort beaches, Romanian resident Caroline Juler expertly guides you through the varied landscapes that is today's Romania. Starting with a detailed introduction to the country's unique history, food, land, and culture - factors that have clearly shaped the distinctive traditional character of the Romanian people - the book then explores in-depth each of the sections of the country, including Maramures in the north, Moldavia in the east, Wallachia in the south, and Crisana and Banat on the country's western flank. ‘National Geographic Traveler: Romania’ covers every area to visit, such as the beautiful 2000-year-old city of Cluj, the limestone formations and the underground rivers and caves of the Apuseni Mountains, and the medieval towns and castles of Vlad the Impaler's Transylvania. Special detailed features give comprehensive information on many diverse topics such as Romanian folk music, the bears and wolves that still prowl the hinterlands, the excellent Romanian wineries, the ethnic minority officially known as the Roma but to this day referred to as Gypsies, and the many myths that immediately come to mind whenever you mention the country's Transylvania region. Caroline Juler went to Romania for the first time in 1993, when the country was still reeling from the shock of revolution. Although it was almost literally on its knees, she met people whose generosity and humour made such a great impression that she felt compelled to return. To her surprise, Blue Guides commissioned her to write the Romanian edition, and during the next six years she travelled around much of the country, meeting people from all walks of life and exploring this extraordinary, unexpected and, by the West at least, largely forgotten part of Europe by public transport and a variety of aged motor vehicles. A travel memoir called 'Searching for Sarmizegetusa' (2003) followed her involvement in the campaign to save Rosia Montana from destruction by open cast mining. Caroline has been to Romania every year since her first visit and has recently bought a traditional wooden house in Maramures. She also writes for 'Galleries' magazine, makes sculptures and has done one or two not entirely happy stints as a tour guide. Organised by the Romanian Cultural Centre in London / Ratiu Foundation and The Embassy of Romania in the UK